When you buy goods it means you've entered into a contract with the seller of these goods and you are protected by law in the event that the goods you have purchased are "faulty". Problems can range from defective, unsafe, damaged in transit or you may just have changed your mind.

Problems with goods can range from defective, unsafe, damaged in transit or you may just have changed your mind. Faulty goods are defined as:

  • they do not match the description of the goods
  • they are not of satisfactory quality
  • they are not fit for purpose

Manufacturers often offer a warranty on their products, either for free or at a cost. These warranties are in addition to your statutory consumer rights and in no way replace or limit them in any way.

Your consumer rights are valid against the retailer who sold you the product in question, even if the retailer is different from the manufacturer of the goods.

If the goods are faulty you are entitled to claim a repair or replacement of the goods from the retailer.  Alternatively, if you have not used the goods, and they were faulty when delivered, you may be entitled to a full refund.

  • Detailed advice on specific problems with faulty goods and explanation of what to do in their event is available from¬†Citizens Advice Consumer:

Detailed template letters to use when making a written complaint about a range of specific problems are available from Citizens Advice.

Comprehensive, searchable guides explaining what you can do to address a variety of specific problems covering a wide range of goods are available from Which? Consumer Rights.

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